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Date Day Topic, Links Homework (to do tonight, due for next class)
31-May-17 W

Intro to course, policies

Opening activities; PowerPoint

I. Support Group Activity

II. Overview Assignment: In Search of Shakespeare (4 parts, to be watched out of class) due any time before June 8 (hand in on Blackboard). Feel free to watch with your scene members or compare answers.

 

What to read for next class:

  • Shakespeare: The Basics (STB) pp 9-49 (Quiz is based on second edition; see Blackboard)
  • terms to know for quiz
  • Also bring syllabus quiz
1-Jun-17 R

I. Quiz on Shakespeare's Language

II. Support groups formed

III. Readaround (Much Ado)

 

What to read for next class:

Much Ado Act I (use audio on Blackboard to help you with comprehension; don't worry if you don't understand every word)

2-Jun-17 F

I. The Imagery Analysis

II. Shakespeare's Language and the Imagery Analysis

III. Shakespeare's Language: Class, Gender, Performance

Context/ Links


What to read for next class:

  • Much Ado Acts 2 and 3
  • Read STB 73-103 (3 and most of 4) (If your book didn't arrive yet, see Blackboard under Readings)
  • Terms to know for quiz
5-Jun-17 M

Quiz on Shakespeare's stage and film

I. Intro to Shakespeare's stage

II. Much Ado 2 and 3 (multple plots)

  • masque scene (2.1)
  • Gulling scenes (2.3 and 3.1)
  • male bonding (3.2) and female bonding (3.4)
  • Comic subplot (3.3 and 3.5)
  • Don John and the "discovery" unscene (2.2 and 3.3)

What to read for next class:

Much Ado Acts 4 and 5

6-Jun-17 T

I.Imagery Analysis (group work)

  • Find people doing the same image pattern as you. Get together and help each other find examples. Make sure you can explain how the examples are used and what they mean.
  • Look for wordplay examples in key scenes: (scenes with long speeches, high formality, high emotion, or playful bantering).
  • Remember: the key is to find examples from the entire play, so I know you did the work.

II. Disgrace scene (4.1)

III. Readaround: final scene

IV. Practice reading Shakespeare: verbs

V. Genre and Comedy

Discussion:

  • New historicists' view of gender in Shakespeare:

    Is women's desire for independence a fantasy? do they rebel against fathers' authority only to submit to lover's authority, and is that submission the point of the play?

Much Ado Imagery Analysis due today at midnight

What to read for next class:

7-Jun-17 W

I. Quiz (Genre/Comedy)

II. Imagery Analysis (discussion)

II. Merchant of Venice -- Act 1

  • 1.1 Antonio, Bassanio, and the Salads
    • Queer theory
  • 1.2 Portia, Nerissa, and the caskets (read aloud)
  • 1.3 Shylock, Antonio, Bassanio (read aloud)
    • Jacob and Laban

III. The Jews (Context) and Exploration

Imagery patterns (Note: don't pick animals if you picked them last time)

  • Self knowledge and division (“two headed Janus”)
  • Ocean/storm/voyage/navigation/ “sandy hour glass” /
  • Religion, heresy, and conversion (as metaphors)
  • Money, venture, and investment
  • East (spices, exotic things)/ islands
  • Acting and stage-related things
  • Speech, words, and silence/
  • language (native and foreign)/ quibbles/ riddles/legal language
  • Games (archery, hazard)
  • Animals (especially unclean animals like dogs--but don't pick animals if you did it last time)

 

What to read for next class:

Merchant (Acts 2 and 3)

 

8-Jun-17 R

I. Discussion: Play scenes

  • Riddles: 2.1, 2.7 (Morocco), 2.9 (Aragon), 3.2 (Bassanio)
  • Lorenzo and Jessica 2.6
  • Shylock 3.1

Context/ Links

In Search of Shakespeare film due

What to read for next class:

  • Merchant (Acts 4 and 5)
  • Merchant Imagery Analysis due by class time tomorrow
9-Jun-17 F

I. Paper Discussion (full assignment/deadlines on Blackboard)

  • Bring printed Merchant of Venice and Much Ado Imagery Sheets to class
  • Work in groups on thesis sentence
  • Example (this one is longer and more involved than the paper you'll be doing): Altick: Hamlet and the Odor of Mortality
  • Example student paper on Blackboard

II. Merchant of Venice -- Acts 4 and 5

  • Long Act 4
  • 5.1: Famous lovers
    • Dido and Aeneas
    • Troilius and Cressida
    • Pyramus and Thisbe
    • Jason and Medea

Context/ Gender links

Context 4:1: Bullying

Context 5.1: Comparable lovers

Merchant Imagery Analysis due by class time today

What to read for next class:

Bring Shakespeare Set Free to every class for Twelfth Night play unit

       
12-Jun-17 M

I. Teaching Assignment (Groups). Full assigment and deadlines on Blackboard

 

Thesis sentence for paper due today (by midnight)

What to read for next class:

Twelfth Night (Act 2)

13-Jun-17 T

I. Discussion of thesis sentences

II. Return to groups to finalize stage directions. Then give your part to another group. One of you should go with that group to serve as director. The other members will remain to act for another group (note: all should act, so double up where necessary).

III. Character study (10 minutes) from pages 95-7 in SSF

IV.Wach 2.2 ("I am the man")(Globe 42:16)

V. 2.3

  • Learn the catch "Hold thy peace thou knave" (see sheet music here)
  • Three versions of 2.3:
    • Globe 45.13
    • Supple 29.37; 34 (song)
    • Nunn 49:20

VI. Two close readings: 1.3 (willow speech) and 2.4 (gender)

What to read for next class:

  • Twelfth Night (Act 3)
  • Watch three versions of 2.5 online
14-Jun-17 W

I. Sword fighting (Shakespeare in love 1:05:59; She's the Man 1:06:50)

II. Challenge scene 3.2 (end), 3.4227-83 1:59:12 (Globe); 1:37:00 (Nunn); Sebastian arrives (2:08:50 Globe-2:14:20);

III. Cross-gartering (Nunn) 3.4 1:46 (Globe)

IV. Feste and Viola (handout); Olivia & Cesario (3.1) 1:33.06; 1:05:19 (She's the Man)

 

What to read for next class:

Twelfth Night, Act 4 and 5

 

15-Jun-17 R

I. Last two acts of Twelfth Night

II. Introduction to tragedy

Tragedy and Comedy; selections

  • Greek heroes, nobility, and hamartia
  • English heroes, politics, and power
  • McEvoy: "When powerful historical forces come into conflict, individuals are sometimes the site of that conflict and are destroyed by it"
  • The king's two bodies: Who is Prince Hamlet without his office? Can we separate kingship from personality?
  • Female betrayal and male identity
  • Female power and chaos
  • Prophecy and self-determination

III. Context/ Links

 

What to read for next class:

One of the three essays at the front of the book Shakespeare Set Free.

Post your thoughts on Blackboard (not Facebook) in the discussion section at the top of the Assigments folder), and respond to other posts. And see Monday's homework as well:

Powerpoint presentations should be done in my office during the next three class days (Friday, Monday, or Tuesday. Weekend available for emergencies)

What to read for next class:

16-Jun-17 F No class; post on Facebook a discussion of one of the four essays (it should be at least 250 words long and should address some of the teaching issues in the play), respond to two other posts, and meet with your groups about creating PowerPoint for papers and scheduling a time to meet with me.

Powerpoint presentations should be done in my office during the next three class days (Friday, Monday, or Tuesday. Weekend available for emergencies)

What to read for next class:

       
19-Jun-17 M

I. Quiz on tragedy

II. Introduction to tragedy

Tragedy and Comedy; selections

  • Greek heroes, nobility, and hamartia
  • English heroes, politics, and power
  • McEvoy: "When powerful historical forces come into conflict, individuals are sometimes the site of that conflict and are destroyed by it"
  • The king's two bodies: Who is Prince Hamlet without his office? Can we separate kingship from personality?
  • Female betrayal and male identity
  • Female power and chaos
  • Prophecy and self-determination

III. Macbeth I and Tragedy

Motifs and themes:manhood and gender, omens and prophecy, cannibalism; being and knowing; babies and compassion; clothing and disrobing; the metaphor of acting [Character or characterization as revealed in action or its representation]; oceans, dismemberment, seeds and growing, heath

Key words: strange (16x; 2nd most of plays), bloody (most frequent), night (4th most); most common substantive words are now, time, fear, self, man, well, why, great (not including titles and names)

Phrase: Give me your hand (tragedies)

Historical forces in conflict:

  • Definitions of manhood
  • Military values vs. courtly values
  • Meritocracy (medieval Scotland) vs. absolute monarchy (early modern)
  • What is reality? Supernatural vs psychological
  • Acting vs being

Macbeth Film (Patrick Stewart version) 13:00-34

Act 1

  • 1.1, 1.3 Witches language\
  • 1.2 Description of Macbeth (seeds)
  • 1.4 (planting/growing) primogeniture
  • 1.5 [compare NFS]
  • 1.7

 

Macbeth Act 2

20-Jun-17 T

Begin discussion: What does it mean to be a man? Does exceeding that standard make one "so much more a man" or "none"?

I. Macbeth Acts 2

  • 2.1 (32-63)
  • 2.2.1-73
  • 2.2.74-95
  • Acts 2.1, 2 (2.01.28);

Gender links

Textual history: 1.2, 3.5, 4.1 (40-65) revision or collaboration?

  • Written 1606 (references to Gunpowder plot January - March 1606; referred to in 1607; metrical tests place between Lear and A & C)
  • First performed at court August 7, 1606 during visit by King of Denmark
  • Viewed at Globe 1610 by Simon Forman
  • Published 1623 (from promptbook)

Performance links

Macbeth Act 3

21-Jun-17 W

Macbeth Film (Rupert Goold/Patrick Stewart & Kate Fleetwood version)

  • 1.1 18:00 "full of growing"
  • 3.1 Murderers (1:33:09)
  • 3.4 (1:18:40)
  • 3:5 (not in all editions

Context/ Links:

Political links

 

Complete Imagery Analysis on Macbeth

Macbeth Act 4 and 5

22-Jun-17 R

Last imagery analysis due

Macbeth Act 4 and 5

  • 4.1 Vision of Stewart kings and the babies (1:39)
    • 1-65 group reading
  • 4.3 Sounding of Macduff in England (1:49:30)

Read Othello Act 1 for Monday

Homework: use FB group to hold Group discussions: King James, Nationalism, Time, and Divine right vs. Tyranny

  • Group 1. Read 4.1: 71-175: What are the prophecies? What is their effect on Macbeth? On the audience?
  • Group 2. Read 4.3: 1-137 What is going on between Malcolm and Macduff in this scene? What are its political ramifications?
  • Groups 3. Read 4.2 1-32; 4:3 159-240. These two scenes show Macduff's family and present two different takes on manhood and responsiblity. List and discuss
  • Group 4: Discuss Macbeth's speeches in 5.5 (they all concern time). putting this play in context, what do you think Shakespeare is saying about time?
23-Jun-17 F

Act 5

  • 5.4 Birnham wood (2:14)
  • 5.5 Death of Lady Macbeth and "the cry of women" (18:40)
  • 5.8 (last scene): Malcom's final speech

 

 

Due Monday

Bring notes from external source(s) to class

Othello Act 1

       
26-Jun-17 M

Othello

  • Zeffirelli's Opera version
  • Words: soul, heaven, hell, damned, faith, Moore, handerchief, honest, whore/strumpet, love, monster, hate, devil, jealous

Imagery: black, white, military, animal (avoid), cannibalism, ocean, witchcraft, prostitution, clothing, travel (exotic), poison, nature, art, plants, monstrous birth

Play scenes

Group presentation: Act 1

 

 

What to read and due for next class:

Othello, Act 2

27-Jun-17 T

Othello 2

  • 2.1.220-310 relay
  • 2.3.245 (film 1:03.18)

Group presentation: Act 2 (Heather, Daisy, Anna)

What to read and due for next class:

Othello, Act 3

28-Jun-17 W

Othello Act 3

  • 3.3.90-end globe 1.18.20 (Parker 48.58)
  • 3.4 pass the handkerchief; read and watch lines 32 (Othello enters) to 98 (Othello exits)

Group presentation: Act 3: Savannah, Josh, and Marshall

Othello, Act 4 and 5

29-Jun-17 R

Othello 4 and 5

  • Act 4, SSF page (Hunter and JB)

4.1 Globe version 2: 9:00

4:2,3

5.2 45.14

  • Act 5 (Francisco and James)

What to read and due for next class:

Paper due tonight by midnight

All teaching materials and reflection due by tomorrow.

Homework for tomorrow: (no class): Finish watching the play (acts 4 and 5) using the globe production part 2 or the Trevor Nunn production or the Parker version. Engage in a real conversation with some of your classmates on Facebook using one of these four prompts as a starting place:

  1. Some argue that by turning savage at the end, Othello confirms the worst racial stereotypes.  Others say that Iago destroys him by exploiting what we find noblest in human beings—their ability to love passionately, their trust in others, and their idealism.  Which do you believe? Support your argument with the text.
  2. In 4.3, Emilia challenges the double standard of expecting chastity and fidelity of women only. How is that double standard and the fear of female infidelity a destructive force in Shakespeare’s plays, not only for women but for men? Support your argument with the text.
  3. Othello’s mysterious background (Egyptian, Asian, Moorish, Spanish, Muslim, Christian convert, victim of Muslim pirates, etc.) makes him an amalgamation of 17th century British notions about empire, notions fed by a belief in racial superiority over those they colonized. To what extent do you see Othello as a product of colonialism? Does he confirm those stereotypes or confound them—or both?
  4. What have you learned about Shakespeare that you didn’t know before? What do you appreciate better? Why do you think his plays are still taught, watched, and made into movies? Try to be specific, using the text for support.

(I'll grade this sometime Sunday).

30-Jun-17 F

All teaching materials and reflection due by tonight.

 

 
Dr. Mary Adams, instructor
last updated 20-jun-17