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Day Date Topic Homework for Next class
T 8/22/17

Introduction to Shakespeare

Links:

Shakespeare and Audiences

Support Groups

Context

PowerPoint

 

Begin watching In Search of Shakespeare. (links below work on campus. Also available as a streaming video from Netflix and on Blackboard).

Fill out this form as you watch, and turn it in by 10/31/17 (Tuesday, advising day).

Read: Shakespeare's Language (see Blackboard)

What to study for quiz on Shakespeasre's Language (see Blackboard, Content, Readings, Shakespeare's Language)

R 8/24/17

Shakespeare's Language

I. The Imagery Analysis

II. Shakespeare's Language and the Imagery Analysis

III. Shakespeare's Language: Class, Gender, Performance

Context/ Links

 

  • Richard III Act 1 (read with Audio)

Imagery Analysis (bring form to class; we'll begin one together).

T 8/29/17

Rhetoric and Imagery Analysis Practice (in groups)

Read Richard III, 1.1 (and see speech of this character as he kills Henry VI at the end of Henry VI part 3)

Film

  • 14:20 Princess Anne mourns her dead husband/fiance, the murdered son of Henry VI
  • 30:19 1.3 Richard orchestrates a domestic scene
  • 47:04 children and Richard (2.2)
  • 48:00 3.1 Regent Richard and young prince Edward (now king)
  • 59:35 3.7 staged show with Lord Mayer
  • 1.08.55 Richard loses Buckingham's good will
  • 1:17:00-1:26 4.4 Queen Margaret and the women
  • 1:32:10 5.5 Battlefield (night before)

Themes

Context

History Plays: Context

Read: Richard III Acts 2 and 3

 

 

R 8/31/17

Richard III, Act 2 and 3

  • 1.2 Anne's courtship (14:20 Princess Anne mourns her dead husband/fiance, the murdered son of Henry VI)
  • 1.3-2.1 Family manipulation (30:19 )
  • 3.1 Regent Richard and young prince Edward (now king) (48:00)
  • 3.7 staged show with Lord Mayor (59:35)

 

Read Richard III, Acts 4 and 5;

Imagery Analysis (we'll do this one in class)

Example imagery sheet

What to study for quiz

T 9/5/17

First Imagery Anaysis Due Today

Richard III, Act 4 and 5

Questions:

  • Women and children in the play. Why so many?
    • Act 2.2 and Act 4.4
  • What's great and what's amateurish about this early play?
  • What is the conflict, and how does the resolution to the conflict play out?
    • Politics: By what right does the king govern? How do kings get and maintain power?
    • Metaphysics: Is Richard's end "just"? Is his punishment deserved? Is God or Providence at work (see prophecies)?
    • Pschology: Is Richard a stereotypical "vice" or is he more complex? What evidence do we have? What causes him to do evil?

Text

History

 

 

Read Henry V Act 1 plus 1599: Prologue (through page 23)

What to study for Quiz

R 9/7/17

1599: Prologue

Henry V Act 1

  • Prologue
  • Canterbury conspiracy
  • Canterbury's language and Colbert's lead-in

 

History and Context

Shakespeare's texts

Shakespeare's stagecraft

excerpts from film and Elizabeth I

  • 1599 Chapter 1 (23-103)

What to study for quiz

T 9/12/17

Discuss Shapiro, 1599 23-103

Discussion; excerpts from Henry V (film) and Elizabeth I

Critical Approaches: Source Study

Context:

  • War in Ireland
  • Henry IV part 2: epilogue (public domain)
  • War in Lisbon: 27:00
  • Court dynamics 37:01
  • Cecil 46:00
  • James I and succession negotiations Disk 2 57:46
  • Cadiz: Another triumphant return for Essex 1:03
  • War in Ireland Disk 2 1:08:20

Battle of Wills

Great Blow in Ireland

Burial at Westminster

Sermon at Richmond

Band of Brothers

  • Contested war stories
Henry V Act 2 AND 3
R 9/14/17

Henry V Act 2 AND 3

Themes: bastardy, suffering of innocents,grafting, horses

Minor plot (parodies or exposes irony in major plot)

Characters: foreigners (Fluellen, Jamy, MacMorris, Katherine and nurse): Shakespeare's buffoons are those who aren't culturally or linguistically fluent so become the butt of wordplay

Textual issues: Bourbon in Q (this text), Dauphin in Folio (most texts). See 3.7

  • 2.0 Chorus
  • 2.1,3 Pistol
  • 2.2 summarize
  • 2.4 (end) 40:11
  • 3-3.4 (film 42.56
  • 3.3 (mineshafts)
  • 3.5,7 French Court

 

Henry V Acts 4 and 5
T 9/19/17

Imagery Analysis Due Today

Henry V Acts 4 and 5

Paper 1 Discussion and thesis brainstorming

Henry V, etc.

I can drink with any tinker in his own language -- Prince Hal, I Henry IV

  • Metaphorical patterns: plants and weeds/farming/manual labor/rape/dismemberment/eating and vomiting/illegitimacy/animals
  • Katherine--women and language 51:30 (3.4) and 2.02.38 (5.2)
  • [2:12:40] Long view of war? cf 5.3.320-7 and epilogue
  • The ironic circle: 1 Henry VI
  • King as Linguist: 4.0, 4.1 vs. 5.2 (Willliams and Harry -- language of class)
  • Foils of king as linguist:
    • Pistol and French Soldier 4.4
    • Fluellen 4.7
  • [1:30:50] Glory of war? 2 speeches in 4.3
    • Killing of boys 4.6-7
    • Pistol's end 5.1
  • Elizabethan Parallels: The Earl of Essex Prologue 5.0 (and see 1599, 23-103)

Shapiro 107-170

What to study for quiz

R 9/21/17

Shapiro 1599 107-170

See excepts Elizabeth I

  • 37:20 Plots
  • 1:02 Cadiz and return

Context:

Book Burning

Is this a Holiday?

Read Julius Caesar Acts 1 and 2

Begin Imagery Analysis

T 9/26/17

Thesis sentence due today

Julius Caesar Acts 1 and 2

Julius Caesar, Acts 1-2

  • 1.2 Caesar and Antony (Lupercal race, w. Casca, Calpurnia, Soothsayer); Brutus and Cassius; Cassius reports crowning scene (7 parts) BBC 5:04

Julius Caesar Acts 3 and 4

 

Reminder: Film sheet for In Search of Shakespeare is Due Tuesday, 10/31/17 end of day

R 9/28/17

Paper 1: Thesis sentence discussion

Context

Adaptations and Diversions

Read Julius Caesar Act 5;

What to study for quiz

T 10/3/17

Imagery Analysis Due Today

Discussion of thesis sentences

Julius Caesar

Act 4-5

  • Men and Women: 4.2
  • 4:1 Triumvirs plot
  • 4.2 Brutus and Cassius quarrel; Portia dies; Brutus can't sleep (1:28-134:30; 1:38 (16th c. song by John Dowland)
  • 4.2 Brutus, Cassius , and Ghost of Caesar (film to 1.58)
  • 5.1 Negotiations with Antony and Octavius (read: 7 parts)
  • 5.3 the battle turns (1:49)
  • 5.5 Antony: This was a man

Read Shapiro 1599: 173-249

No Imagery Analysis for As You Like It; instead, bring quotes for your paper for me to check Thursday

Character Reports are due tomorrow at midnight.

R 10/5/17

Paper 1 Notecards due for check

Shapiro 1599: 173-249

Fluff

Context -- AYLI

Character Reports

As You Like It, Act 1-2
T 10/10/17

Character Reports, Continued

AYLI

As You Like It, Acts 1-2

Context

AYLI, Acts 3 & 4
R 10/12/17

Research Papers (due in stages)

As You LIke It, Acts 3-4: "The perfect woman is a man"-- House M.D.

  • Stradanus (van der Straet) on Renaissance hunting
  • 2.1 Introduction to duke and court; hunting
  • 2.4
  • 2.7 minor characters of double plot
  • Petarch's Five Stages of Man from his Tronfi: 1. Man in his youthful state is the slave of love. 2. As he advances in age, he feels the inconveniences of his amatory propensities, and endeavours to conquer them by chastity. 3. Amidst the victory which he obtains over himself, Death steps in, and levels alike the victor and the vanquished. 4. But Fame arrives after death, and makes man as it were live again after death, and survive it for ages by his fame. 5. But man even by fame cannot live for ever, if God has not granted him a happy existence throughout eternity. Thus Love triumphs over Man; Chastity triumphs over Love; Death triumphs over both; Fame triumphs over Death; Time triumphs over Fame; and Eternity triumphs over Time.
  • Ardenne/ Arden as forest/garden
  • Biblical allusions: Adam and feuding brothers
  • Pastoral elements: Silvius/ Phoebe and English reality check version Wiliam and Audrey (allusions to Marlowe)
  • Plot changes from Lodge's Rosalynde
  • 3.1 36:15 Playmark
  • 3.2 (24 minutes)
  • 3.4 (2 minutes), 3.5
  • 4.1 (10 minutes)

Context

AYLI, Act 5

Shapiro, 1599 pp 254-320

Quiz guide (for after break)

T 10/17/17 FALL LBREAK: NO CLASS
R 10/19/17 FALL BREAK: NO CLASS
T 10/24/17

AYLI Act 5

final scene: 1:44 Playmark

Shapiro, 1599 254-320

Hamlet is on the "Fault line of irresolvable ethical conflict" (300). Caught between irreconcilable belief systems.

Hamlet Act I and working thesis sentence due

Imagery Analysis form for Hamlet

R 10/26/17

Hamlet: Act I and Thesis sentence due (send me the thesis in an email by today at 5 pm).

Opening of Hamlet:

Hamlet, the Text

Teaching Hamlet

  • Mel Gibson goes back to school (improvisation unit 3): 7:30
  • Shakespeare set free, acting, and unit plans

Read Hamlet Act 2 and 3, plus Shakespeare Set Free Actvities for Act 2 and 3 (see Blackboard):

  • Do SSF activities for Lesson 8 (either 2, 3, or 4) and bring to class in list form
  • Write an essay based on questions 1 and 2 in Lesson 9 (2.2)
T 10/31/17 ADVISING DAY: NO CLASS
R 11/2/17

Discussion of thesis sentences and possible support

Hamlet Act 2

Hamlet Act 3

Read Hamlet Act 4 and 5

T 11/7/17

Imagery Analysis: Hamlet due

Hamlet Act 4 and 5

  • Dekker's Wonderful Year
  • Macbeth: Physical Shakespeare
  • Last soliloquy (cut from Folio): 4.4 (Branagh Disk 1 2:32:30) and an exercise on imagery for students
  • Ophelia 4.5 (2:14:30) (Tennant)
  • Death of Ophelia; grave scene end of 4.7-5.7 (2:23:20) (Tennant)
  • Same scene, Branagh (disk 2 38:22)

Shapiro, Epilogue and Kernan Chapter 1

What to study for quiz on Shapiro

What to study for quiz on Kernan

R 11/9/17

Working bibliography due today

Shapiro, Epilogue and Kernan, Chapter 1: Art and Theater in Service of the Leviathan State

Finish Hamlet

[Medieval revenge feuds aka Romeo and Juliet are intolerable to society, and yet as the] "first modern intellectual of our literature," Hamlet realizes that "power is in the hands of a class whose values humane people feel they must repudiate." — Arnold Kettle, Marxist [The "fatal flaw" is not in the individual but in the state and the social order it upholds]

"Tragedy is so far from being a proof of the pessimism of the Greeks that it may, on the contrary, be considered a decisive rebuttal....Saying Yes to life even in its strangest and most painful episodes, the will to life rejoicing in its own inexhaustible vitality even as it witnesses the destruction of its greatest heroes ... Not in order to be liberated from terror and pity, not in order to purge oneself of a dangerous affect by its vehement discharge — which is how Aristotle understood tragedy — but in order to celebrate oneself the eternal joy of becoming, beyond all terror and pity...." — Friedrich Nietzsche

Kernan, Chapter 2 + Measure for Measure, Act 1

Imagery Analysis due by tomorrow at midnight

 

What to study for quiz

T 11/14/17

Imagery Analysis form for Measure for Measure (do either this one or the last one; substitute your character analysis for the one you don't do).

Kernan Chapter 2 and M for M act 1

Shakespeare's collaborations

Measure for Measure, Acts 2 and 3
R 11/16/17

M for M Act 2 and 3 \

Extra credit link: Follow this link and "like" the page you land on: https://www.conquestgraphics.com/news/nonprofit-partners-2017/humane-society-of-jackson-county

Then get 15 friends to like it; each 15 friends will eliminate one absence. OR 25 friends will replace one quiz. (Just give me the list of names)

  • Matthew 7:2
  • 2.2 (36:58)
  • 2.4 31-end (2 parts) 49:18
  • 3.1 58-171 (3 parts)
  • 3.2

 

 

 

Measure for Measure, Acts 4 and 5
T 11/21/17

All notes due on notecards

M for M Act 4 and 5

  • 4.3 (Barnardine)
  • 5.1 (51.34)

Start last imagery analysis (or substitute a charactger study analysis) and hand in Measure for Measure imagery analysis or character study by Sunday evening at midnight.

Kernan Chapter 3 + King Lear or All is True Act 1

King Lear 1 (Read The Tragedy of King Lear (right-hand facing pages only, staring on 2319) based on F1, not The History of King Lear (left-hand facing pages) based on Q1, and not the conflated text that follows. Note differences from recording....)

What to study for quiz

R 11/23/17 THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY: NO CLASS
T 11/28/17

King Lear or All is True Act 1

Lear: Textual issues (quarto) (folio)

Theories of Tragedy:

Tragedy is an imitation of an action that is admirable, complete (composed of an introduction, a middle part and an ending), and possesses magnitude; in language made pleasurable, each of its species separated in different parts; performed by actors, not through narration; effecting through pity and fear the purification of such emotions. — Aristotle, who adds that the protagonist should be great & the reversal attributable to hamartia or misstep, not "tragic flaw"

"When powerful forces come into conflict, individuals are sometimes the site of that conflict and are destroyed by it." — Sean McEvoy, scholar

"Viewed externally, Hamlet's death may be seen to have been brought about accidentally...but in Hamlet's soul, we understand that death has lurked from the beginning: the sandbank of finitude cannot suffice his sorrow and tenderness....we feel he is a man whom inner disgust has almost consumed well before death comes upon him from outside." — G.W.F.Hegel

[Medieval revenge feuds aka Romeo and Juliet are intolerable to society, and yet as the] "first modern intellectual of our literature," Hamlet realizes that "power is in the hands of a class whose values humane people feel they must repudiate." — Arnold Kettle, Marxist [The "fatal flaw" is not in the individual but in the state and the social order it upholds]

"Tragedy is so far from being a proof of the pessimism of the Greeks that it may, on the contrary, be considered a decisive rebuttal....Saying Yes to life even in its strangest and most painful episodes, the will to life rejoicing in its own inexhaustible vitality even as it witnesses the destruction of its greatest heroes ... Not in order to be liberated from terror and pity, not in order to purge oneself of a dangerous affect by its vehement discharge — which is how Aristotle understood tragedy — but in order to celebrate oneself the eternal joy of becoming, beyond all terror and pity...." — Friedrich Nietzsche

Textual studies and the problem of King Lear (PowerPoint)

Performed at court in December 1605. Reference to Harsnett's Popish Impostures puts it no earlier than 1603. The Tragedy of King Lear (Folio) 1-2 vs. the History of King Lear (Quarto1 set from foul papers)

  • Inexperienced printer: lineation errors. Two typesetters: aural errors. Illegible handwriting.
  • Folio thought to be Q2 (which comes from Q2) but annotated against promptbook (now lost).

The Play

Scenes

  • Understanding Lear (McKellan)
  • Two openings of Lear
  • 1.2 (Edmund the machiavel vs. Edgar). Double plot.
  • Lear 1.4 (Paul Scofield) egg speech.
Lear, Acts 2 and 3
R 11/30/17

Lear Discussion board: open until Wednesday at midnight (see Assignments folder on Blackboard)

Common imagery and word patterns in Lear: nature, carnivorous animals, monstrosity, redemption and "redeem", female sexuality, dressing/ undressing, clothing and nakedness

The Tragedy of King Lear 2-3

  • Lear 2.2 (Lawrence Olivier). Edgar, Harsnett and the Exorcism wars.
  • Lear 2.2 294 (Ian McKellen) (2.4 in conflated text)
  • Lear 2.2.294 (Paul Scofield)
  • Lear 3.2 (Olivier)
  • Lear 3.2 (James Earl Jones)
  • Lear 3.2 (Interesting all female production at USC)
  • 3.2, 3.4 Lear's madness and "Poor Tom"
  • 3.7 Blinding of Gloucester

Questions: Can goodness overcome evil? Is nature benificent or hostile to humanity? Explore the paradox of "naturalness."

Bestial and paradoxical female sexuality

On the paradox

  • Paradox (new world encyclopedia)
  • Star Trek TNG Finale scene
  • continued (1:56)
Lear, Acts 4 and 5
T 12/5/17

Lear scenes

  • 4.1, 4.5 Gloucester and his father (4.6 in conflated text)
  • 4.2 (read--5 characters) Albany's reversal and the possibility of justice
  • 4.6 Cordelia returns (4.7 in conflated text)

Lear on homelessness

Lear Act 5 (5.3 18-20 minutes)

Christian repentance, prayer, and redemption?

  • Lear: "When thou dost ask me blessing, I'll kneel down/ And ask of thee forgiveness" ll. 10-11
  • Edgar: "The gods are just" l. 160
  • Albany: "This judgement of the heavens, that makes us tremble/ touches us not with pity" ll.205-6
  • Lear: "This feather stirs. She lives. If it be so/ it is a chance which does redeem all sorrow/ that ever I have felt" ll. 239-241
  • Albany: "All friends shall taste/ the wages of their virtue,and all foes/ The cup of their deservings." ll.277-9

Kernan, Chapter 5

What to study for quiz

Last imagery analysis or character study due tomorrow at midnight

R 12/7/17

Kernan 5; Final exam review

Final research paper due

 
FINAL EXAMS
M 12/11/2017 ENGL 431: SHAKESPEARE 12-2:30
R 12/14/2017 ENGL 609: POETRY 6-9
F 12/15/2017 ENGL 390: BIBLE 12-2:30
 
Dr. Mary Adams, instructor
last updated 16-nov-17